An illuminated sign outside the theatre reads, 'In a world full of endless possibilities why must we still limit ourselves with labels' This reimagining of Mike Bartlett's play, produced at the Royal Court Theatre in 2010, now has extraordinary relevance within the sexual politics of the 2020's. It is sublime combination of humour, farce and searing drama. Perfect in every aspect.

Staged on Merle Hensel's impressive shiny metallic semi-circular cockpit with one swivel entrance and two ring revolves, it creates an appropriately cold and harsh environment, exposing the interwoven lives of the four characters. With Marianne Elliott's flawless direction every nuance of every line delivers, and working with Annie-Lunnette Deakin-Foster as movement director, the connections and misconnections of the character's relationships are imaginatively spun out. Literally going round in circles. The physical choreography heightening the narrative.

As John, Jonathan Bailey shows just how fantastic an actor he is. He embodies the life and struggles of his character right to the end of his expressive fingertips His superb physicality can in one moment portray John as a figure of fun and then switch to a man ridden with guilt and angst.

Taron Egerton's performance as M is equally impressive. Seeing his outward control crumble as he tries to hang onto his seemingly endless but flawed love for John. Finally turning to his father (Phil Daniels) in a desperate attempt to regain his love, but at what cost? Daniels wonderfully pitched performance adds much to a farcical meal when John's two lovers meet and verbally fight like cocks for the prize.

As W, the woman that the supposedly gay John accidently meets and falls in love with, Jade Anouka gives the stand-out performance. The complexity and control she brings to the character is enthralling. Never willing to reveal her true want although pushed to the limits. Not until she breaks in her final bitter plea.

This is play that exposes the massive rift between love and sexuality. The struggle that can exist to be who you are in a Society that likes it's labels and can't understand someone who isn't willing to comply. As John, finally accepts the 'easy' rather than his 'want' and lets out an excruciating silent scream, it makes you desperate for change and a Society that accepts difference in all its forms.

LATEST REVIEWS